Holistic Horse Training
Horsemanship Horsemanship was originally a collective term for equitation in general. Horsemanship is the art to handle horses naturally, that is, in a way that respects the horse and that it can understand. The aim of horsemanship is a harmonious relationship between human and animal. Both in groundwork and while riding, only methods and tools should be applied that do not overburden the horse or cause it pain or anxiety. The rider and thus horse trainer should be able to understand the body language of the horse and interpret it correctly in order to communicate with the horse.

Equitation Science

The International Society for Equitation Science (ISES) 

www.equitationscience.com

is a not-for-profit organisation that chiefly aims to facilitate research into the training of horses to enhance horse welfare and improve the horse-rider relationship. ISES runs international conferences where latest research findings and their application in practice can be communicated and discussed. It also provides a pool of expertise for international bodies and academic institutions that approach ISES with questions related to horse behaviour, training and welfare.

What is Equitation Science?

Equitation science promotes an objective, evidence-based understanding of the welfare of horses during training and competition by applying valid, quantitative scientific methods that can identify what training techniques are ineffective or may result in equine suffering.

How I came to it.

Let´s start from the beginning. I did not decide to give lessons. I was asked if I could help. Thus, my riding instructor career started with horse people who had handling problems with their horses over 20 years ago. I worked with many different horses, some horses dragged their owner to the muck heap, whatever they wanted there ... Some welcomed them by biting them. Some broke away etc. etc. etc. Word got around that there was someone who could help. Over the years, however, my teaching has moved primarily to riding.  My horsemanship I see horsemanship as described in the box on the right. Today unfortunately, this term was mainly reduced to some training methods. I never had lessons in horsemanship training. Of course, I looked around quite a lot, but it was the horses that taught me and not people. Who better than the horses know how to deal with horses? Who better than the horses know their body language? So the horse itself led me to question what I have heard, led me to read, to research and to participate in different seminars and courses about horses. I think we should adapt our training to the nature of the horse. My horsemanship is therefore based on experience and on scientific knowledge in the field of ethology. Because I am teaching in Australia, I came in contact with the AEBC (Australian Equine Behaviour Centre). www.aebc.com.au First established in 1990 by Dr Andrew McLean, AEBC has aided hundreds of horses and riders achieve success and build a stronger partnership. Recognised as the leading horse training centre using evidence-based training techniques, founded in equitation science, AEBC produces confident horses prepared to excel in any chosen discipline. They offer ESI-Courses, where I am working towards my Diploma in Equitation Science. Equitation Science International is internationally recognised as the first accredited training centre dedicated to improving horse training using an evidence-based and ethical approach. When I teach horsemanship. I give honest information about horses in order to help people better understand themselves and their horses. It is important to promote the potential in each horse and horse owner so they can achieve a good relationship. To learn to understand the horse’s behaviour makes the horse owner feel more confident, thereby allowing her or him to act ethically and obtain sustainable solutions. The best long-term solution is always adapted to the ability of the horse owner, the horse and their environment. There is no template fitting everyone. My principles are pure horsemanship and they condemn no other methods. But my thoughts on training are based on verifiable facts. These I teach my students, so they can confidently use that knowledge to improve their own abilities.
©2017 Holistic Horse Training
Holistic Horse Training

Equitation Science

The International Society for Equitation Science (ISES) www.equitationscience.com is a not-for-profit organisation that chiefly aims to facilitate research into the training of horses to enhance horse welfare and improve the horse-rider relationship. ISES runs international conferences where latest research findings and their application in practice can be communicated and discussed. It also provides a pool of expertise for international bodies and academic institutions that approach ISES with questions related to horse behaviour, training and welfare.

What is Equitation Science?

Equitation science promotes an objective, evidence- based understanding of the welfare of horses during training and competition by applying valid, quantitative scientific methods that can identify what training techniques are ineffective or may result in equine suffering.

How I came to it.

Let´s start from the beginning. I did not decide to give lessons. I was asked if I could help. Thus, my riding instructor career started with horse people who had handling problems with their horses over 20 years ago. I worked with many different horses, some horses dragged their owner to the muck heap, whatever they wanted there ... Some welcomed them by biting them. Some broke away etc. etc. etc. Word got around that there was someone who could help. Over the years, however, my teaching has moved primarily to riding. My horsemanship I see horsemanship as described in the box on the right. Today unfortunately, this term was mainly reduced to some training methods. I never had lessons in horsemanship training. Of course, I looked around quite a lot, but it was the horses that taught me and not people. Who better than the horses know how to deal with horses? Who better than the horses know their body language? So the horse itself led me to question what I have heard, led me to read, to research and to participate in different seminars and courses about horses. I think we should adapt our training to the nature of the horse. My horsemanship is therefore based on experience and on scientific knowledge in the field of ethology. Because I am teaching in Australia, I came in contact with the AEBC (Australian Equine Behaviour Centre).  www.aebc.com.au First established in 1990 by Dr Andrew McLean, AEBC has aided hundreds of horses and riders achieve success and build a stronger partnership. Recognised as the leading horse training centre using evidence-based training techniques, founded in equitation science, AEBC produces confident horses prepared to excel in any chosen discipline. They offer ESI-Courses, where I am working towards my Diploma in Equitation Science. Equitation Science International is internationally recognised as the first accredited training centre dedicated to improving horse training using an evidence- based and ethical approach. When I teach horsemanship. I give honest information about horses in order to help people better understand themselves and their horses. It is important to promote the potential in each horse and horse owner so they can achieve a good relationship. To learn to understand the horse’s behaviour makes the horse owner feel more confident, thereby allowing her or him to act ethically and obtain sustainable solutions. The best long-term solution is always adapted to the ability of the horse owner, the horse and their environment. There is no template fitting everyone. My principles are pure horsemanship and they condemn no other methods. But my thoughts on training are based on verifiable facts. These I teach my students, so they can confidently use that knowledge to improve their own abilities.
©2017 Holistic Horse Training
Horsemanship Horsemanship was originally a collective term for equitation in general. Horsemanship is the art to handle horses naturally, that is, in a way that respects the horse and that it can understand. The aim of horsemanship is a harmonious relationship between human and animal. Both in groundwork and while riding, only methods and tools should be applied that do not overburden the horse or cause it pain or anxiety. The rider and thus horse trainer should be able to understand the body language of the horse and interpret it correctly in order to communicate with the horse.